Skip to main content

Home & Garden

Unpublished

April 12, 2013

Embedded Scribd iPaper - Requires Javascript and Flash Player

THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013
A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO
&
Scotts Best Annual Program
$59.99
After $20.00 Mail-in Rebate. You Pay $79.99
15,000 Sq. Ft., 7287162...$154.99 After $45.00 MaiI-in Rebate. You Pay $199.99
3700 S. Dixie Hwy.
I-75 & Breese Rd., Lima
419-991-3701
Store Hours
Mon-Fri 9am-7pm,
Sat 9am-6pm, Sun 12am-5pm
Covers 5000 sq. ft. Crabgrass Preventer Plus Fertilizer, Weed Control Plus
Fertilizer, Lawn Fertilizer and Winterizer. 7287154 Limit 2 rebates total.
Scotts
®
Lawn Pro
®
4-Step AnnuaI Program
Residence
offers home
for flora, fauna
By SUSAN REIMER
The Baltimore Sun
BALTIMORE (MCT)
— Leonard Sachs and
Lainy LeBow-Sachs have
turned their world out-
side-in.
Te renovations and
additions to the Baltimore
power couple’s Reister-
stown, Md., home make
it ideal not only for enter-
taining large groups, but
for entertaining birds, too.
Fond of plants and
fowering shrubs as well,
Leonard commissioned a
solarium that defes Mid-
Atlantic winters.
And the fagstone that
was once the exterior of
the house is now part of
the study and den and in-
formal dining area, giving
the house a rustic, mascu-
line quality.
“It is the perfect place
to come home to,” said
Lainy, who works as an
executive vice president
at the Kennedy Krieger
Institute.
Te couple has been
married for almost half of
the 47 years Leonard has
lived here, and the house
has gone through a num-
ber of major renovations
and additions.
“Te house has seen a
lot of diferent lives,” said
Jay Jenkins, the interior
designer for three of the
most important rooms in
the house for the couple:
the kitchen, the solarium
and the frst-foor master
bedroom.
“It is a labor of love for
them. A lot of very talent-
ed people have brought
their best eforts, and
every job has been very
complementary.”
Te frst-foor bed-
room is surrounded on
two sides by large win-
dows that look out on a
cluster of birdhouses and
bird feeders and bird-
baths. Te couple can lie
in bed in the light-flled
room and, if they are very
still, they can watch a va-
riety of birds arrive, eat,
bathe and depart.
“We fll the feeders ev-
ery Monday,” Lainy said.
“And in the morning, we
lay in bed and watch the
birds.”
“You have to be very
still,” said Leonard. “Tey
notice any movement in
the house.” Neting sur-
rounds the bird sanctuary
to keep out cats and other
predators. And it is plant-
ed with an abundance of
fowering shrubs and wis-
teria to atract the birds.
“We worked to make
it a comfortable, cleaner
place,” said Jenkins. “In-
teracting with the out-
doors is very important to
both of them.”
Doors on either side
of the bed in this bright
room lead to long, narrow,
his-and-hers bathrooms,
very modern, practical
and luxurious. “We can
meet in the middle,” Lainy
said, laughing.
Te second foor,
where all the original bed-
rooms are located, now
serves as the pied-a-terre
for the couple’s blended
family: fve children and
nine grandchildren.
And the kitchen, with
family pictures every-
where, is more than up
to the task of feeding the
crew — or 200 guests at a
See FLORA, Page 3C
Home-grown vegetables
make for better cooking
Now is the time to plan a home-grown garden to help reduce expenses for groceries as well as to help make
home-made dishes taste better. They are fresher and typically picked at the peak of flavor.
By CARLA MEYER
Staff Writer
A culinary arts instruc-
tor explains there are
many benefts from eating
foods grown in a home
garden.
Apollo Career Center
Culinary Arts instruc-
tor Carrie Hamilton said
along with health bene-
fts, home grown produce
can be monitored.
“Besides the health
benefts from eating fresh
fruits and vegetables, if
grown in your home gar-
den you can monitor the
pesticides and chemical
applications,” Hamilton
said.
In addition, favor is
also a consideration.
“Fresh harvested foods
have beter favor, foods
lose moisture when they
are held and transported,
home harvested foods
have beter favor,” Ham-
ilton said.
Also, crops grown in
home gardens do not have
to be eaten right away, as
there are methods to pre-
serve the items, so they
can be enjoyed anytime of
the year.
“Summer harvested
food can be frozen and or
canned to give you qual-
ity produce all year long,”
Hamilton said.
But, while planning to
eat in-season items, it is
important to plan meals
according to what is sea-
sonable.
“Planning meals ac-
cording to fruits and
vegetables in-season is
not only cost efective, it
ensures beter quality,”
Hamilton said. “I always
use  seasonable produce
when planning and pre-
paring meals.”
Barbara Damrosch,
organic gardening expert
and co-author of the book
Te Four Season Farm
Gardener’s Cookbook
said the simplest methods
of gardening work best.
“Tere is very litle you
can’t accomplish in the
garden if you trust the
systems that are already
in place,” Damrosch said,
noting anyone can start a
garden —  even with the
modest amounts of time
and space.
Damrosch shared or-
ganic vegetable gardening
is both helpful for families
and is good for the planet.
In addition, she said this
can “make a serious dent”
in food expenses.
Damrosch suggested
to pass up the modern
habit of eating any crop
any time of the year by let-
ting a home garden supply
fresh produce.
“Fruits and vegetables
that come from halfway
around the world were
ofen harvested far too
early and can have a dis-
appointing, bland taste,”
Damrosch said. “By plan-
ning meals from your
garden, you’ll become a
more creative, improvisa-
tional cook.”
When choosing which
plants to grow, Damros-
ch said to consider how
much space is available
for the crops.
“Salad crops, for ex-
ample, give you the most
variety in a garden of lim-
ited size,” Damrosch said.
“Consider prioritizing
crops whose favor is most
notably lacking in a su-
permarket varieties, such
as tomatoes, strawberries,
cucumbers and melons.”
Damrosch addressed
the issue of weeds and
said not to let weeds get
ahead of the gardener.
See COOK, Page 2C
Staff photo/William Laney
Apollo Career Center Culinary Arts instructor Carrie
Hamilton says there are health benefits from eating
homegrown fruits and vegetables as well as they make
home recipes taste better.
Leonard Sachs and Lainy
LeBow-Sachs live in
Stevenson, Maryland in
a contemporary stone,
glass and wood home
that brings nature indoors
and art outside. Here, a
sculpture is featured.
By KAREN KANTNER
Assistant Managing Editor
Composting is an easy
way to help the environ-
ment while growing a per-
son’s own food, experts
say. Make the most out of
your garden and start dig-
ging.
Compost — organic
mater decomposed, recy-
cled and used for fertiliz-
ing soil — is great for the
garden and helps reduce
landfll waste. It also saves
money and is less expen-
sive than bagging yard
trimmings and paying to
have them removed.
Compost improves soil
and the plants growing in
it, according to the Ohio
State University Exten-
sion Of ce. Anyone with a
garden, lawn, tree, shrubs
or even planter boxes can
beneft from having com-
post.
Compost returns or-
ganic mater to the soil in
a usable form, improving
plant growth by stimu-
lating the growth of ben-
efcial microorganisms,
loosening heavy clay soils
to allow beter root pen-
etration, improving the
capacity to hold water and
nutrients, and adding es-
sential nutrients to the
soil, according to infor-
mation from the horticul-
ture and crop science’s di-
vision of OSU Extension.
Composting can help
the environment, not
only by growing healthier
plants to clean the air and
conserve the soil, but the
yard wastes and kitchen
scraps used in compost,
use up valuable space in
landflls — space that
is running out, said Joe
Heimlich, who studies
composting for OSU Ex-
tension.
He said yard waste
and kitchen scraps make
up 20 to 30 percent of all
household wastes and be-
cause of their high mois-
ture content they lower
the ef ciency of incinera-
tion systems.
“Using compost means
your garden will be more
cost-efective because you
will have to spend less on
fertilizers, insecticides
and fungicides for a given
harvest of any crop,” said
Bret L. Markham, author
of “Te Mini Farming
Guide to Composting.”
Across the country,
people are
e mb r a c -
ing the
c o n c e p t
of self-
suf ciency
and pre-
paredness,
and “mini-
f ar mi ng ”
anywhere
from roof-
top to ur-
ban gar-
dens to
suburban
backyards to larger land
plots, according to the
StatePoint news service.
Growing food has be-
come easier than ever and
composting is a huge part
of that movement.
Te following tips are
for those wanting to get
started with composting
at home:
• Use food waste, grass
clippings, cofee grounds
and shredded paper.
Other good additions in-
clude sawdust, fruit and
vegetable peelings, and
egg shells. Composting
is a natural form of recy-
cling, although some food
scraps such as
meat, bones
and faty
foods should
not be com-
posted. Tey
atract pests
and slow de-
composition.
• Start a
compost pile
in a conve-
nient spot,
making sure
it is semi-
shaded and
well-drained.
• Add bulking agents
such as wood chips to ac-
celerate the breakdown of
organic materials, allow-
ing the fnished material
to fully stabilize and ma-
ture through a curing pro-
cess. Leaves, hay, straw,
See COMPOST, Page 3C
Spring Home & Garden
2C
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Thursday, April 11, 2013
1103 Apollo Drive
Wapakoneta, Oh 45895
419-738-8882
• Furnace
• Air Conditioning
• Geo Thermal
• Whole House Generator
• Water Heaters
• Water Softeners
• Pumps
• Plumbing Fixtures
• Bath Remodel
Rebates up to
$
1,350
00
March 1
st
- June 30
th
, 2013
*Now Hiring Qualified Technicians*
Composting at home
can help soil and landfills
“Once they’ve gained
the upper hand, geting
rid of them can seem al-
most impossible,” Dam-
rosch said. “Te ideal time
to control weeds is when
they are tiny, right afer
they frst appear.”
A gardening tip Dam-
rosch provided is to plant
in straight rows, which
can help control weeds.
“Gardening can revo-
lutionize the way you eat,
and help you take greater
control of your family’s
nutrition,” Damrosch said.
In addition to eat-
ing healthy, gardening is
great exercise, according
to North Carolina State,
North Carolina Coopera-
tive Extension’s Success-
ful Gardener publication.
Gardening burns any-
where from 250 to 400
calories per hour, depend-
ing on intensity of garden-
ing chores.
North Carolina State
also notes gardening can
relive stress and provides
mental relaxation.
Te publication also
noted gardening can be
done with the whole fam-
ily, as it shows children
responsibility and respect
for living things and na-
ture.
“With the rewards
of fruits, vegetables and
fowers, gardening pro-
vides tremendous enjoy-
ment and brings beauty
to you and the world,” the
publication said.
Davis Metal Roofing
and Construction
P.O. Box 211
Wapakoneta, OH. 45895
419-645-6000
METAL ROOFING
SPECIALIST
No other roof offers the same protection, savings, and
lasting beauty as a steel roof. Invest in your home
today with a worry-free roof that provides peace of
mind for the future.
AMERICAN MADE
Every component of a steel roof is made in the United
States. ALL 100% Made in America.
WARRANTED FOR A LIFETIME
Our non-prorated warranty covers the cost of materials
and labor. If you sell your home, we give subsequent
homeowners the same protection for up to 40 years
from when the roof was installed. No other roofing
manufacturer provides this level of comprehensive
A name you know
a Family you can Trust
We are a family owned and
operated business dedicated
to providing you the highest
quality and satisfaction you
deserve in every project.
Matt & Jamie Davis
Cook From Page 1C
Carla Meyer
Staff Writer
419-739-3516
reporter1@wapakwdn.com
Home owners have
several ways they can
compost including
making bins from wood
or the newer way by
purchasing garbage-can
looking devices to store
the compost material and
to stir it.
Using
compost means
your garden will
be more cost-
effective ...
— Brett L. Markam
Vegetables can just be eaten they do not have to be-
come part of a recipe.
Great Prices • Great Products • Great Service
CELEBRATING 49 YEARS!
937-498-7023 SIDNEY
419-586-3700 CELINA
800-753-4779
FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATES
Choose the
Original
Wissman
Compost From Page 2C
3C
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Thursday, April 11, 2013
Spring Home & Garden
C
o
l
d
w
a
t
e
r
L
umber S
h
o
w
r
o
o
m
NOW OPEN
COLDWATER LUMBER
Cabinets • Closets • Doors
Interior Showroom
Displaying
• Over 30 Interior Doors,
in various species
& colors
• Stairways, fully assembled
• Haas/Homestead Cabinet
Displays
Displaying
• Wide Variety of Interior
Mouldings
• Countertops in Quartz,
Corian, Granite &
Wilsonart
YOU CAN BUILD ON OUR EXPERIENCE!
FREE In-Home
Consultation & Estimate
Located inside
Professional Finish. . .
508 N. Second St., Coldwater
419-678-2306
nancyw@coldwaterlumber.net
IT’S SO MUCH MOWER
®
Covington, OH
937-526-4851
Botkins, OH
937-693-3848
W. College Corner, IN
765-732-3081
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday
APRIL 20, 2013
7:00 - 12:00 Noon
Powerfold® Electric Deck Lift
$500 OFF*
ANY IMPLEMENT
OR ACCESSORY
• • • • • • • • • • • •
OR
• • • • • • • • • • • •
0% FINANCING*
FOR 54 MONTHS*
*Cannot be combined with any other Grasshopper promotion. certain restrictions may apply. 0% financing available with approved credit. See
grasshoppermower.com/financing for offers or visit participating Grasshopper dealer for complete details. Offer expires 04/30/13.
STOP BY AND CHOOSE
YOUR SAVINGS!
GRASSHOPPERMOWER.COM
Indian Lake’s
Finest
GREENHOUSE
GARDEN
VEGETABLES
Tomatoes, Peppers,
Cabbage, Melons
Seeds, Potatoes,
Onion Sets
& Plants
ANNUAL FLATS
$
14
.99
Hanging Baskets
Morel Mushrooms
Assortment of
Produce
PERENNIALS • PERENNIALS
STRAWBERRY PLANTS
Bring in your containers for
our designers to fill!
LARGE PATIO
PLANTERS
12233 St. Rt. 235 North side of Indian Lake
Across from the Go Cart Track
(937) 843-9488
Open Daily 9am-6pm
Sunday Noon-5pm
C
&
S
F
A
R
M
M
A
R
K
E
T
grass clippings and green
manure may all be used to
bulk up the pile. Each lay-
er should be no more than
2 inches so grass clippings
and leaves don’t get mat-
ted down and form a layer
impermeable to air.
• Keep the compost
moist, not soaked, either
by watering it or leting
rain take care of it.
• Cover the compost
pile to help it retain mois-
ture and heat, which will
also prevent the compost
from being overwatered
by the rain.
• Turn the compost
pile with a shovel or fork
to aerate the pile. Turning
the pile more ofen makes
compost faster. It is im-
portant to water the pile
as it is being turned. Turn-
ing the pile adds oxygen
which is necessary to get
the most out of the pile.
• Compost is ready to
use when it is dark brown,
crumbly and earthy-
smelling. Piles may be
kept in bins made from
snow fencing, woven wire,
block or brick, or wood or
in prefabricated plastic
bins. A simple heap works
fne, unless food wastes
are added, which may at-
tract animals. Food scraps
should be buried deep in
a compost pile. Grass and
sod should be removed
from the area where a
compost pile is to be to
allow direct contact of the
materials with soil micro-
organisms.
• Once compost is add-
ed to a garden, planting
may begin in two to fve
weeks. Woody yard trim-
mings, leaves and grass
clippings can be used as
a mulch for weed control
and water retention by
spreading them beneath
plants.
fundraiser.
Te Sachses are promi-
nent patrons of the arts in
Baltimore as well as civic
causes. Leonard Sachs
chaired the restoration of
Penn Station and com-
missioned the signature
“Man/Woman” sculpture
out front.
Also designed by Jen-
kins and partner Alexan-
der Baer, the kitchen has
gleaming Mexican tile
foors and counters, part
of an expansion that cre-
ated a cozy den at one end
and a huge farm-style din-
ing area at the other end,
both next to the cooking
area.
“I used to do a lot more
cooking. I even made my
own bread” said Lainy,
the longtime aide to the
late Gov. William Donald
Schaefer. “When I stop
working, I will go back to
cooking.”
“Te den is a litle fall
and winter place to go,”
said Jenkins. “Te scale is
more intimate, the colors
deeper and darker, and a
freplace.”
Te couple used to do a
great deal of traveling, too,
and mementos abound.
Lainy has a collection of
tiny Limoges boxes, of
whimsical teaketles, of
paperweights and of el-
ephants.
Te art on display also
refects the couple’s trav-
els and is a dynamic mix
of bold colors and geo-
metric designs.
“I buy what I appreci-
ate,” said Leonard, when
asked about his interests
in art. “I like color, shapes.
I like the free-ness of the
colors. Te pieces just
suited us.”
He and Lainy have safa-
ried in Africa and biked in
Switzerland, France and
Holland.
Tey have hiked in
Alaska and the Canadian
Rockies and visited Chi-
na, Russia and Norway,
and gone white-water raf-
ing in Yellowstone. Tey
will be married 20 years
this May.
Life has slowed for
both, and now their favor-
ite destination is the so-
larium Leonard adores. It
extends from what used to
be the front of the house
down toward the pool.
Glass-enclosed and
with an irrigation/sprin-
kler system, the in-ground
garden is planted with
orchids and a variety of
green and fowering plants
and is gently lit from the
rafers above at night to
magical efect.
“If someone sends me
a plant, we fnd a place
for it,” said Leonard, who
has also taken up painting.
“Even in winter, I am sur-
rounded by fowers and
plants.”
“Leonard wanted to
make it a place that was
more appropriate for
Lainy to be with him,”
Jenkins said of the space.
Tere are a desk, a com-
puter work station, a tele-
vision and a beautifully
rendered model of the
Pride of Baltimore, on
which he had the privilege
of sailing.
On display in the solar-
ium is the fag that draped
Schaefer’s cof n, pre-
sented to Lainy afer the
services, which she coor-
dinated. But it was clearly
Leonard’s space before
the changes.
“She wanted to be there
with him,” said Jenkins.
“Our job was to make the
room a more special place
for the two of them to
spend time together.”
Flora From Page 1C
Karen Campbell
Asst. Managing Editor
419-739-3517
reporter2@wapakwdn.com
Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun/MCT
Leonard Sachs, left, and Lainy LeBow-Sachs relax
with their puppy, Ozzie, in the sunroom of their Ste-
venson, Maryland home, a contemporary stone, glass
and wood home that brings nature indoors.
Ways to fight garden pests
By LANCE MIHM
Staff Writer
Nature itself can ofen
be its own worst enemy.
However, modern ad-
vances have made it pos-
sible to apply practices to
help local home fower
or vegetable garden reach
their full potential, pro-
tected from insects and
other pests that may afect
its growth.
OSU Extension Agency
Education Director John
Smith said in many areas,
gardeners just need to
practice the same prac-
tices that farmers covering
thousands of acres do.
Te biggest diference
between home gardening
and commercial farming is
the use of pesticides. Pes-
ticide use is heavily regu-
lated, and farmers must
receive certifcation and
training before being al-
lowed to administer them
to their crop. Receiving
certifcation for home
gardens simply would not
be economically feasible
in most situations, Smith
said, however, Bayer Prod-
ucts is currently releasing
an insecticide that will be
available to the general
public that may help in
some cases.
“You will not be able
to use it on plants before
they blossom,” Smith said.
“So plants that continue to
blossom, such as potatoes,
beans or tomatoes could
not get an application. It
would be safe for carrots
and other plants that don’t
continue to blossom.”
Smith said he talked to
representatives at the re-
cently-opened True Value
Hardware Store in Wapa-
koneta about carrying the
product. He said the store
would have the product
available within a week.
However, there are
still many other ways to
prevent a person’s garden
from being invaded. Many
plant species, such as spin-
ach, chard, and beans, are
naturally resistant and are
not infested nearly as of-
ten. Also, check with a fa-
vorite seed or plant vendor
on hybrids or cultivars that
are disease- and insect-
resistant.
Healthier plants also re-
sult in plants less likely to
be susceptible to insects.
Provide the plants with ap-
propriate amount of water
or soil conditioners for the
specifc species to encour-
age proper development.
Catnip, basil, marigolds,
and dahlias are among
many plants that are bug-
repelling. Te deter many
species of insects while
adding color and a sweet
aroma to a garden.
Weeds not only com-
pete with other plants for
nutrients, many are also
natural harborers for some
See PESTS, Page 5C
DROESCH FARM SERVICE
7354 St. Rt. 119 • Maria Stein, OH 45860
419-925-4526 • sales@droeschfarmservice.com
*See dealer for disclaimer information and financing information.
Anyone can learn to garden, say experts
By JANICE BARNIAK
Staff Writer
ST. MARYS — Te
frst time people gar-
den, says Candy Forlow,
owner of the Flower and
Plant Barn in St. Marys,
they ofen think they can
simply put plants in the
ground and harvest the
vegetables.
She wants people to
know there’s a litle more
involved.
“Weed and water, weed
and water,” she said.
Tis time of year gar-
deners are just begin-
ning to shake the dust
of their tools, start their
seedlings inside and
speculating about how
cold the nights will get
throughout April. More
people are opting to gar-
den, she said, in a move-
ment to save money and
eat healthier.
Home gardener and
former president of Roots
and Shoots, Luann Eg-
bert, agreed.
“You know what you’re
puting in your mouth,”
she said. “You can control
the chemicals, compared
to buying in the grocery
store where you have no
idea, she said, of what
may have been used.”
Current crops to plant
are onions, letuce, rad-
ishes, spinach and snow
peas. A person can also
begin their tomato plant
inside if they’re interest-
ed in having early toma-
toes.
Forlow said pansies
and violas could also go
in around now, as they
could handle a late spring
frost.
In a few weeks, when
the nights are less cold,
people can plant cabbage,
broccoli and caulifower
— all plants that like
cooler spring weather.
“When it’s hot they
have a tendency not to do
as well,” Egbert said.
Afer May 15, growers
can move on to tomatoes,
peppers and other warm
weather crops.
One mistake of early
gardeners, Forlow said, is
to plant much more than
they can eat. She said
it seems like if a person
plants one seed, it dies,
but if they plant two both
survive, and they have
bushels of tomatoes.
New gardeners, however,
will plant six to 12 plants,
which is almost always
far more tomatoes than
they can eat.
In those cases, Egbert
recommended giving the
extra food to a program
like God’s Storehouse.
Many food banks accept
produce, she said.
Te secret to great
plants, Forlow said, is re-
ally no secret at all.
“Follow the plant tag,”
Forlow said. “If it says full
sun, plant in full sun. If
you plant it in the shade
it won’t do as well.”
As for watering, the
last few years there’s been
a trend of the season
starting out wet and then
drying out, so plants do
need watered, and con-
tainer gardens tend to
need more watering than
gardens in the ground.
“Ideally, you water in
the mornings, not in the
full sun in the middle of
the day,” Forlow said.
“Tere should be no pud-
dles on top of the soil.”
If it’s hot or windy, it’s
important to water daily
so the plants don’t dry
out.
Both experts recom-
mended tomatoes as the
easy beginner plant to
grow. Te Celebrity or
Rudker breeds of tomato
are good easy plants
A question newbie
planters also have is
whether they need to use
pesticide.
Forlow said that in-
sects can eat every leaf
on every plant in the gar-
den if a person doesn’t do
something to stop them.
Egbert, having grown
up on a farm, said there’s
a lot a person can do if
they choose not to spray,
things like cooperation
planting, which is when
a person plants varieties
together in ways that re-
pel pests.
While the planting
has to be individualized
based on what a person
wants to grow, Egbert
said the information is
easy to obtain.
“Te computer is a
great place for fnding a
‘home recipe,’” she said.
When it comes to
planting, it’s an old art
becoming much more
high tech as a growing
body of information on-
line via videos, websites
and how-to blogs give
people new ideas of how
to achieve their garden-
ing goals.
Forlow said many
more people are looking
for unusual plants.
“People are asking for
things they see on the
Food Channel,” Forlow
said. “Fingerling pota-
toes, ancho poblano pep-
pers.”
Tis year she’s going
to try selling a chocolate
pepper, which is a sweet
variety, and the stevia
plant, which is an herbal
relative of the sunfower
whose leaves are sweet.
“I love that new stuf,
just love it,” Forlow said.
Egbert said she likes to
garden for the taste.
“A lot of it doesn’t
make it into the house,”
she said, adding it’s be-
cause she’s eating while
she harvests. “Anyone
can do this. Even in a
pot.”
Staff photo/Janice Barniak
The greenhouse at the Flower and Plant Barn in St. Marys has multiple options available for those who want
to start a home garden.
4C
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Thursday, April 11, 2013
Spring Home & Garden
Spring Is Outdoor Fun Time
playmorswingsets.com
1/2 Mlle West o| Lowes · 3930 Llloa Po. · Llma, OH
419-224-7676
Mon-Sat 10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. · Closeo Sun
Summers
Landing
W
e also carry
5’ Glide Starting at $359!
at
Building Your New Home on a Foundation of Trust & Value
4XDOLW\)HDWXUHV6WDQGDUG,Q2XU+RPHV 4XDOLW\)HDWXUHV6WDQGDUG,Q2XU+RPHV 4XDOLW\)HDWXUHV6WDQGDUG,Q2XU+RPHV 4XDOLW\)HDWXUHV6WDQGDUG,Q2XU+RPHV
2x6 Exrer|or wa||s - '6´ D.0. u|rn R-2' lnsu|ar|on va|ue
/noersen w|noous & Par|o 0oors u|rn lou-E S|ass
l|gn Ell|c|enr Furnace u|rn 0enrra| /|r 0ono|r|on|ng
0|mens|ona| Rool $n|ng|es u|rn J0 Year warranr,
ano man, more qua||r, learures
FOUR HOMES ON DISPLAY
IN WAPAKONETA AT THE I-75 & US-33 INTERSECTION
13999 Cemetery Road - P.O. Box 296, Wapakoneta, OH 45895
Mon-Fri 9:00-5:00, Sat. 10:00-4:00, Sun. 1:00-4:00 or by appointment
1-800-738-7406
www.REBECKERBUILDERS.com
HOMEBUYERS
You may qualify for up to a
$5000.00
Down Payment Grant
from the
Welcome Home
Program
Sponsored by The Peoples Bank Co. and Federal
Home Loan Bank of Cincinnati
Contact us for details!!
Effective3/1/13 - Limited time offer – Some restrictions do apply
The
Peoples Bank
Co.
Uo|dwater Uo|dwater Uo|dwater Uo|dwater - -- - Ue|ìna Ue|ìna Ue|ìna Ue|ìna - -- - 5t. Marys 5t. Marys 5t. Marys 5t. Marys
Pockford Pockford Pockford Pockford - -- - ßurkettsvì||e ßurkettsvì||e ßurkettsvì||e ßurkettsvì||e
www.pbcbank.com
1o|| Iree 1-866- PßU ßANK
Member I0IU- Lqua| Pousìng Lender
Kitchen & Bath Plus
221 S. Buckeye St.
Celina • 567-890-9663
“The Remodelers Choice”
• Kitchen & Bath Cabinetry
• Countertops
• Replacement Windows
• Interior Doors & Trim
Mon. - Fri. 9-5 • Sat. 9-1
• Tile & Hardwood Flooring
1900 Celina Rd., St. Marys, Ohio 45885
419-394-7883 Fax: 419-394-6162
Scaffolds - Concrete Tools - Drills
- Pressure Washers - Trenchers
1950 Havemann Rd. • Celina, OH
419-586-3777
All Your Lawn
& Garden Needs!
Come check out our Garden Center.
For healthy lawns, start today
BY MEREDITH ENKOFF
Staff Writer
ST. MARYS — Although the of-
cial start of spring did not bring warm
weather, it is not too soon to be think-
ing about geting out the gardening
gloves and bags of fertilizer. Several
local lawn and garden experts recently
revealed what residents can do in these
early spring months to have a healthy,
green lawn by the summer.
Brothers Caleb and Josh Cisco own
Cisco Lawn and Landscaping in St.
Marys, and have been open since the
spring of 2009.
“Get your grass treated for crabgrass
and (do) early spring fertilization,” Ca-
leb Cisco said.
April and May, he said, is a good
time for overseeding, or spreading
grass seed over and existing lawn with
a slit seeder.
“(It) resows grass into any bare areas
in the yard,” he said.
In his opinion though, individuals
atempting to do this kind of work with
their own time and by purchasing the
equipment would be more expensive in
the long run.
“I highly recommend geting pro-
fessional lawn care treatment,” Cisco
said.
Tough Cisco Lawn and Landscap-
ing does not ofer fertilization services,
they do almost any kind of install.
“We put in new stuf for people,”
–––––––––––––––
See LAWN, Page C6
Don’t break bank on kitchens
(BPT) — Take a look
around your home and
think about which spaces
you use most. If the kitch-
en made the list, you’re
not alone. For most ho-
meowners, the kitchen is
the heart of their home,
and all the time spent
there likely causes a fair
amount of wear and tear.
If this sounds like your
kitchen, it might be time
for a remodel.
While the National
Association of Home
Builders fnds that home
remodeling is at its high-
est level since 2005, ho-
meowners are still being
understandably cautious
Beat back mold
(BPT) — Damp, dark
areas of the home, such
as an unfnished base-
ment, can ofen be trou-
ble spots for homeown-
ers hoping to increase
their living space. Lef
unfnished, these areas of
the home can potentially
sufer signifcant dam-
age, be prone to fooding
or develop mold. When
it comes to home im-
provement, homeowners
are wise to consider the
afects of moisture and
mold buildup and how
they can be combated.
Mold growth, usually a
result of excess moisture,
also can be detrimental
to one’s health. Te Cen-
ter for Disease Control
and Prevention says that
mold can survive in al-
most any conditions, and
can cause visual, respira-
tory and even skin prob-
lems. Mold growth can
also contribute to poor
indoor air quality.
Homeowners looking
to turn an unfnished
basement into a liveable
space or take control of
mold growth can help
protect their home from
unexpected expenses lat-
er on, and also add value
to their home. Tere are
several techniques to
control moisture pen-
etrating their home. Te
U.S. Environmental Pro-
tection Agency suggests
homeowners consider
techniques that manage
water outside the foun-
dation walls, ensure that
the home is properly ven-
tilated with exhaust fans
in at least each bathroom
and the kitchen, and
size the home’s air con-
ditioning unit correctly.
Homeowners are also
recommended to use
construction techniques
that can help control wa-
ter, air movement, vapor
difusion as well as con-
densation.
More ofen than not,
mold is found in homes
that do not have adequate
insulation. As moisture
builds up within walls,
the interior of the walls
can start to slowly rot.
Tis rot can emit a foul
smell and eventually re-
duce the stability and
quality of the home.
Homeowners who want
to address moisture and
mold growth should
–––––––––––––––
See MOLD, Page C6
BPT photo
Updating a kitchen can make a big difference — and it doesn’t have to be expen-
sive.
–––––––––––––––
See NEW, Page C6
5C
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Thursday, April 11, 2013
Spring Home & Garden
• Nursery
• Landscape
Design,
Installation &
Maintenance
• Lawn
Installation &
Care
• Sodding
• Paver Patio
• Irrigation
Let us show what
ORANGE
Can Do For You!
419-586-1290
www.duesnursery.com
4380 Monroe Rd., Celina
4380 Monroe Rd., Celina
Where Education &
Experience Meet
Cab|nclrq lhal w|ll lakc
qcur brcalh awaq and
¡r|cc- lhal wcn`l¦
*VTLJOLJRV\[
V\YZOV^YVVTZ
www.ocnkitchcnandbath.com
8 WiIIipic St., Wapakoncta
419-738-811S
2419 fIida Rd., lima
419-228-811S
· lcdall|cn, l|ancnd, waq¡c|nl,
Cardcll : lcll Cab|nclrq
· Cran|lc, Çuarlz, ¬cl|d ¬urlacc :
lan|nalc Ccunlcrlc¡-
· 1|lc lack-¡la-hc-
· lan|nalc, 1|lc, Car¡cl :
lardwccd ¦lccr|ng
· lccr-, 1r|n : ¬la|r larl-
· Clc-cl Crgan|zcr-
· llunb|ng ¦|×lurc-
Cur
lc-|gncr-
¬aq .cu
¦cvcr Ccl
/ 2
nd
Chancc
1c lakc /
Crcal l
-l
ln¡rc--|cn¦
klTCHfN AND BATH
SHOWROOMS
OEN
J & L Power Equipment, Inc.
• KUBOTA GARDEN TRACTORS • SNAPPER-PRO • STIHL CHAIN SAWS

Full Service Shop for Farm, Lawn & Garden Equipment
Jim Harrod
13317 Co. Rd. 25A, Wapakoneta, Ohio, 45895
Phone: 419-738-7834 Fax: 419-738-0373 Email jandlpower@bright.net

cubcadet.com
ZERO-TURNS
THAT ZERO OTHERS HAVE
RZT
TM
S SERIES
4-WHEEL STEER ZERO-TURN RIDERS
• Only Cub Cadet delivers true zero-turn capability with steering wheel control for
superior handling on any terrain, including hills.
• 42” - 54” heavy-duty mowing decks deliver the flawless Cub Cadet Signature Cut.
TM
• 22 HP

- 25 HP

Cub Cadet
®
professional--grade Kohler engines.
$
2,699
99*
STARTING AT
SMART FACTORY FINANCING AVAILABLE
1
AVAILABLE ON SELECT MODELS FOR QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS
H.G. Violet Equipment
103 North Main St
Delphos, OH 45833
Phone 419-695-2000
www.hgviolet.com
(1) Subject to credit approval on a Cub Cadet credit card account. Not all customers qualify. Additional terms may apply. Please see your local Cub Cadet dealer for details.
* Product Price - Actual retail prices are set by dealer and may vary. Taxes, freight, setup and handling charges may be additional and may vary. Models subject to limited availability.
Specifications and programs are subject to change without notice. Images may not reflect dealer inventory and/or unit specifications. †as rated by engine manufacturer.
The Best Buy Seal and other licensed materials are registered certification marks and trademarks of Consumers Digest Communications, LLC, used under license. For award
information, visit ConsumersDigest.com.
CUB CADET
RZT
TM
S
42/46/50/54
species of insects. Weed a
garden ofen, Smith said.
If a person is having
problems with a specifc
pest, releasing natural
predators can ofen help
control common bug.
Tese biological controls
can ofen be obtained
from nurseries or specialty
garden stores. For exam-
ple, lady beetles are known
for their ability to control
aphid populations.
A homemade insecti-
cidal soap can also help.
Pour a quart of water into a
spray botle and mix in two
tablespoons of liquid dish
soap. Spritz the garden to
sufocate existing insects
and minimize future infes-
tations.
A person’s garden can
also be invaded by larger
pests. Several steps can be
taken to keep birds away.
Soda cans or foil pans on
sticks refect sunlight and
also make noise on windy
days, scaring the birds
away. Common remedies
such as fake owls or scare-
crows work.
Pests
From Page 3C
READY FOR
SPRING PLANTING?
Seed Potatoes • Onion Sets & Plants
Cauliflower, Broccoli, Cabbage, Kohlrabi Plant
Pansies & Violas
2420 Celina Rd., St. Marys
419-394-8668
FLOWER
& PLANT
BARN
Call for Hours!
Carpet · Laminate · Hardwood
Ceramic 8 Porce|ain Ti|e · Drapery
Custom Showers · Hunter Doug|as B|inds
Outdoor Living Space
10ó w. Iourth St., Minster · 419-ó28-2ó20 · Hours: Mon & Wed 9-7, Tues & Fri 9-5, Turs & Sat 9-12
Let us help you
have your Dream Backyard
Start p|anning that outdoor |iving space or cover a concrete entry with porce|ain ti|es.
• LIFETIME
METAL ROOFING
• ASPHALT ROOFING
100% Financing • 90 Days S-A-C • Visa - MC
419-738-KISS
100% Financing • 90 Days S-A-C • Visa - MC
S
p
r
in
g
S
a
v
in
g
s
1
5
-
2
0
%
Cisco said. “If you want
some new shrubs, we pull
out the old and put in the
new. In the spring, we put
down mulch and pave
walkways or patios.”
Bill Dysert, grower at
Flower and Plant Barn on
Celina Road, had several
suggestions to early bird
gardeners.
“You want to put a pre-
emergent on to stop the
weed seeds from blowing
into your yard,” Dysert
said. “It stops them from
germinating.”
Tis can be purchased
at any hardware store, he
said, and usually comes
with fertilizer already
mixed in.
“You want to do that
while it’s still cold,” Dy-
sert said. “Take your
spreader and cover the
whole yard.”
For those wishing not
only for green grass but
for healthy fowers, Dys-
ert recommends a prod-
uct called Preen.
“You can put (it) in
your fower
beds and
you should
do that
now,” he
said. Flow-
ers that are
OK to plant
now are
pansies and
violas, he
said, which
are tough
and can
wi t hs t a nd
the chilly
spring days.
Brad Krites, of Krites
Landscaping and Exca-
vating, out of Wapakon-
eta, started his advice at
an even more basic level.
“In a nutshell, the frst
thing to start with would
kind of be the obvious —
get all the stones out of
the yard, any of the trash,
leaves, dead grass,” he
said. “As far as rolling the
lawn — a lot of people do
that, but that’s not some-
thing we would encour-
age.”
Thi s
is done
by drag-
ging a
h e a v y
wei ght
a c r o s s
t h e
l a w n ,
but if
d o n e
w r o n g
can do
m o r e
h a r m
than “Follow with core
aeration - in early spring
is a good idea if it’s not
too wet,” he said.
“What you’re doing is
alleviating any compac-
tion that may be present,”
Krites said. “You’re pro-
viding an open space for
the water and the oxygen
and the nutrients to reach
the roots, where you real-
ly want your fertilizer to
be placed anyway.”
Tis brings soil mi-
crobes to the top of the
dirt, he says, and helps
decompose any thatch,
or dead mater, on top.
“My other suggestion,
any time in the next few
weeks would be a great
time to get fertilizer with
some crabgrass control,”
Krites said. “Tat would
be your next step afer
your lawn is cleaned
up and aeration is com-
plete.”
Afer core aeration
is complete, Krites also
recommends overseed-
ing “where the turf
was thinned out by the
drought,” he said.
Krites Landscaping
and Excavating provides
all these services to most
of Auglaize, Mercer and
Allen counties.
“We do all types of ex-
cavating and we also do
lawn care,” Krites said.
Lawn
From Page C5
consider a complete so-
lution that halts future
opportunities for mold
growth and prevents po-
tential costly repairs in
the future.
Using a modern insu-
lation material such as
spray foam insulation,
like that available from
Icynene, is one solution
that can assist. As a va-
por-permeable material,
spray foam insulation al-
lows moisture to travel
through it, enabling it
to dry completely. Ad-
ditionally, spray foam
insulation is not consid-
ered a food source for
mold, thereby quashing
the probability of further
mold growth. Properly
insulated wall cavities
and crawl spaces control
moisture, minimize air
leakage, save on energy
bills as well as improve
occupant comfort.
Geting to the root of
mold issues is critical for
any homeowner looking
to add investment value
to their home. A mate-
rial like spray foam in-
sulation can be applied
within seconds to the
walls, ceiling and foors
of a basement to plug any
cracks or gaps to deliver
immediate results. More
information on how
spray foam insulation
can help control mois-
ture and mold growth
can be found online at
www.icynene.com.
Mold
From Page C5
“You want to
put pre-
emergent on to
stop the weed
seeds from
blowing into
your yard.”
— Bill Dysert
with their investments. Te good news is that no
mater the size of your budget, there are cost-efec-
tive ways to update your kitchen to revitalize the
center of your home.
1. Yes, you can
update your cabinets
Te most dramatic change you can make in your
kitchen is to update the cabinetry. But for many, the
thought of new cabinetry equates to a budget break-
er. According to Sarah Reep, design lead for Quali-
tyCabinets, it certainly doesn’t have to be. “Te key
is to do your homework and fnd a brand that ofers
the trifecta of style, function and afordability,” says
Reep.-
To keep pace with consumer requests and spend-
ing, QualityCabinets recently expanded its budget-
friendly Woodstar line to include additional in-
demand fnish options, door styles and accessible
design features. “Homeowners want to stay on bud-
get without compromising on style or function. We
designed this line so they don’t have to,” says Reep.
2. Set the stage with a beautiful backsplash
Another afordable way to make a statement is by
updating or adding a backsplash. “A backsplash is
a subtle way to update your kitchen. Choose clean
white subway tiles or add some drama with inter-
esting paterns or colorful glass tiles,” advises Reep.
Home improvement stores like Lowe’s or Te Home
Depot carry DIY tile kits in a variety of colors that
are fairly simple to install yourself.
Additionally, stylish, removable tile decals can
help jazz up your walls quickly without the cost and
commitment of tile.
New
From Page C5
6C
Wapakoneta Daily News
& The Evening Leader
Thursday, April 11, 2013
Spring Home & Garden
WITH SUSPENSION TECHNOLOGY
S
T
A
R
T
I
N
G
A
T
*U.S. Dollars, Model: IS500ZB2444. Financing Available to qualified buyers.
See dealer for details.
*
ZERO-TURN MOWERS
0% for
48 Months!
with equal payments
*
ENGI NE SERVI CE
Sales & Service Since 1953
910 North Second St.
Coldwater, Ohio 45828
Ph: (419) 678 - 2698
Lawn - Garden - Recreational
Equipment Headquarters
www.raffelsengine.com
IT’S NOT A SIDELINE - IT’S OUR BUSINESS
Ferris zero-turns - with patented suspension
technology - provide:
• Maximum productivity
• Increased mower longevity
• Reduced operator fatigue
• Enhanced comfort
• A beautiful manicured
finish every time!
Experience the difference
suspension makes!
DEMO A FERRIS TODAY!
60TH ANNIVERSARY
OPEN HOUSE
April 8-12 : M-F 9 am-5:30 pm • April 13 : Sat 9 am-2 pm
Your One Stop Shop
For All Your Flooring Needs!
Stop in today & browse in our 4,000 sq. ft. showroom.
Quality products - Environmentally friendly.
FREE ESTIMATES • FREE MEASUREMENTS
GUARANTEED INSTALLATION
2640 W. Michigan St. • Sidney
937-497-1101
Hours: M,W,F 9-8 / T, TH 9-5
Sat. 9-2 / Sun. 12-5
Carpet • Vinyl
Hardwood • Tile
Laminate Flooring
Luxury Vinyl
Plush, soft carpeting…
the earthy look and
feel of imported tiles…
smooth, shiny
hardwood. It’s all here.
A Treat for
the Feet…
and the Eyes!
Shop
Everyday
Carpet Specials
$
5
.0
0
off
sq. yd.
Fultz
Warehouse Carpet &
Flooring
Are You Ready for
Pool Season?
• Accessories
• Water Chemistry
• Replacement Liners
SHAWNEE POOLS
Since
1966
4580 Spencerville Rd. • Lima • 419-999-1505
St. Marys Hardware
158 E. HIGH STREET • (419) 394-4257
ONION SETS
SEED POTATOES
& BULK GARDEN SEEDS
J
u
s
t
A
r
r
i
v
e
d
!
Carpet, Upholstery, Tile
& Duct Cleaning
Water & Fire Restoration
ServiceMaster by Case
(419) 738-9405
* Voted Wapakoneta Daily News
and The Evening Leader’s
"Best Carpet Cleaner"
* Serving Auglaize County for 35 Years!!
100% Financing • 90 Days S-A-C • Visa - MC
CALL 419-738-KISS
100% Financing • 90 Days S-A-C • Visa - MC
S
p
r
in
g
S
a
v
in
g
s
S
a
v
e
$
5
0
0
t
o
$
2
5
0
0
• SEAMLESS SIDING •
• SEAMLESS GUTTERS •
• LEAF GUARDS • WINDOWS •
Financing Available
811 Indiana Ave.
St. Marys
419-394-4694
Mon - Fri 8am-5pm
For Cleaner, Great
Tasting Water....Call Us!
U
p
fro
n
t
C
u
s
to
m
e
r
Frie
n
d
ly P
ric
in
g
Plumbing, Heating and A/C
Also accepting
payments through
MARS IPAY
• Softened Water • Filtered Water •
• Drinking Water •
Get Ready Now For All Your
SPRING PROJECTS!
• HOME CLEANOUTS
• KITCHEN & BATH REMODELS
• NEW CONSTRUCTION
Mention This Ad To
Receive Up to
7 DAYS
RENT FREE!
Over 100 Roll-Offs To Serve You
15, 20, 25, 30 & 40 Yard Containers
CONTAINER SERVICES
6980 Staeger Rd. • Celina, OH
419-584-0900
0tk\ 18t 8tk1|
Get ready for Hot Days ahead!
Call for your
SPRING Air Conditioner
TUNE - Up!
Plumbing, Heating,
& Air Conditioning, Inc.
DOTSON
100 W. Main Street
CRIDERSVILLE, OHIO 45806
www.dotsonph.com
419-645-4078
This document is © 2013 by editor - all rights reserved.
AttachmentSize
WDN_HOG_E_Edition.pdf5.61 MB
View more articles in:
  Waynesfield-Goshen High School has offered to pay for students' meals prior to its...
  Wapakoneta High School has fielded a lot of phone calls about the site of its game...
The Wapakoneta Redskins varsity girls basketball team beat St. Marys 57-24 Saturday night in...

 

Classified Ads

Premium Drupal Themes by Adaptivethemes